Female Pattern Hair Loss

Noticeable hair loss can be deeply distressing. Here are some medical treatments that may help.

About one-third of women experience hair loss (alopecia) at some time in their lives; among postmenopausal women, as many as two-thirds suffer hair thinning or bald spots. Hair loss often has a greater impact on women than on men, because it's less socially acceptable for them. Alopecia can severely affect a woman's emotional well-being and quality of life.
The main type of hair loss in both sexes — and the subject of this article — is androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
There are many potential causes of hair loss, including medical conditions, medications, and physical or emotional stress. If you notice unusual hair loss of any kind, it's important to see your primary care provider or a dermatologist, to determine the cause and appropriate treatment. You may also want to ask your clinician for a referral to a therapist or support group to address emotional difficulties. Hair loss can be frustrating, but recent years have seen an increase in resources for coping with the problem.

High Density Hair Transplant

The High density hair transplant at Anagen does not simply transplant a lot of hair. it is our 20 years of know-how that enables all the hair follicles transplanted tightly and abundantly to grow healthy for prolonged period of time.
What is the secret of Anagen’s high density hair transplant?
Immediately after the hair transplant, it looked very dense. However, why does it appear to be sparse after time? When planting trees, it must be executed with considerations for the roots as well. If they are planted too close to each other, the roots will not be able to expand sufficient and firmly settle themselves and those that are not able to absorb sufficient nutrients will eventually die. Mojelim’s high density hair transplant is a surgical procedure that enables all the transplanted hair follicles to grow healthy by receiving sufficient nutrients evenly with all the hair follicle establishing themselves properly rather than simply transplanting as many as possible.

Eyebrow Transplant & Restoration

eyebrow

Eyebrows are a critical facial feature that helps to define the way we look. In any ways, eyebrows are more important to one’s appearance than scalp hair, as eyebrows are in a more central position on the face and serve to frame the eyes (the single most important facial element). 

Unlike the loss of scalp hair, the loss of one’s eyebrows is not viewed as a natural process and is, therefore, not cosmetically acceptable. Eyebrows may be lost for a variety of reasons including thyroid and other systemic diseases, alopecia areata, burns, tattoos, infections, repeated plucking, congenital inability to grow eyebrows and a genetic tendency for eyebrows to thin, or disappear, over time.

Eyebrow restoration is similar to other hair transplant procedures performed on the scalp, in that, for appropriate candidates, the transplanted hair is permanent. However, because eyebrows have their own unique attributes, eyebrow transplants differ from hair transplants in a number of important ways.

Eyebrow Anatomy and Physiology
The direction of eyebrow hair changes dramatically in different parts of the brow. In the region of the eyebrow nearest the nose, the hair points upward. The hair across the top of the eyebrow points outward and downward. The hair in the lower part of the brow grows outward and upward. This criss-cross growth pattern causes the hairs in the middle of the eyebrows to converge and form a subtle natural elevation running horizontally through the middle of each eyebrow. The second distinctive characteristic of eyebrow hair is that the hairs emerge from the follicle at a very acute angle so that the hair grows flat to the skin’s surface. This is in contrast to scalp hair where the angle between the hair and scalp can be 45 degrees.

The third important feature of the eyebrows is that the hairs grow as individual strands, rather than in the 1- to 4-hair follicular unit grouping that are characteristic of scalp hair.  The fourth distinctive element of eyebrow hair is that the hair growth cycle is very short. This means that eyebrow hair will grow (in anagen) only for about 4 months before it enters the resting (telogen) phase and falls out. In contrast, scalp hair has a growth phase that can last 3 to 7 years, enabling the scalp hair to grow much longer.

Hair Loss Information

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At the time of surgery, your scalp was thoroughly cleaned of blood and crusts, but these will tend to re-form soon after your procedure. Care should be taken while cleaning the transplanted site during the 10 days following surgery, because it is during this period that the healing mechanisms of your body secure the grafts firmly in place. However, appropriate care of the recipient area will minimize crusting and make the transplant less noticeable and the healing more rapid.

The morning following surgery, remove your bandage and shower with comfortably warm water.

Allow the shower water to flow gently over the transplant area. You may partially block the flow of the water with your hand so that the scalp is not subject to strong, direct pressure. Lift up the hair in the back of your scalp so that water may irrigate the sutured areas as well. Place a small amount of mild shampoo like johnson and Johnson ( on the sponge that we have given you or on your finger pads, and gently apply the shampoo to the recipient area with a patting or rolling motion. Do not rub. As soon as the shampoo has been applied to the entire transplanted area, rinse the shampoo off with indirect running water. You may use the rinsed sponge or your finger pads to assist in removing the shampoo, but be careful that you pat the area and do not rub. Stop soaking your head as soon as the shampoo is rinsed off. It is not necessary to remove all of the crusting during the first shower. Repeat the showering and gentle shampooing three (3) times the day following surgery. On the second day after the procedure, shower and shampoo twice daily and continue this regime for 10 days. If the scalp becomes too dry, you should switch to Baby Shampoo on the fourth day and continue showering using only the Baby Shampoo for the remainder of the 10 days. Resume your normal shampoo after 10 days and/or when the mild shampoo runs out.

If the grafts are soaked too long, they may swell and rise above the skin surface and appear as little white bumps immediately after showering. This is a problem more likely encountered the first few days after the procedure. It is not harmful to grafts, but indicates that you are soaking too much. As soon as you allow your scalp to dry, they will disappear.

It is important when shampooing, or rinsing the transplanted area, that you are gentle for the first 10 days following surgery. DO NOT RUB, PICK, OR SCRATCH, as this may dislodge grafts From one to four weeks post-op you can expect that some transplanted hair will begin to shed. This is a normal process and should not be a concern. The healthy hair follicles are firmly in place at TEN days post-op and cannot be dislodged. If there is still any residual crusting at this time,you may scrub them off in the shower. First, soften the crusts by soaking them in the shower under direct running water and then, using regular shampoo, scrub them all off. If this is not done, the crusts will eventually fall off naturally as the hairs are shed.Please note that when hairs are shed, there may be a crust at the top and a bulb at the bottom. Remember the bulb is not the root (the growth part of the hair follicle). It is normal for the hair, bulb and associated crust to be shed and this does not represent a lost graft. If a graft is actually lost (something that may occur the first few days following the procedure) there will be bleeding at the site of the lost graft. Therefore, if you don’t see any bleeding, don’t be concerned. Do not use tar shampoo (a dark-colored, medicated shampoo used for psoriasis) on the transplanted area for 10 days following your procedure, as this may interfere with the growth of the grafts.